The Subconscious Mind: What Does Science Tell Us?

on

Unconscious

The subconscious is a part of one of two systems of memory creation. There are two cognitive systems present, one of which the subconscious is a part of, in human beings: the implicit and explicit systems. Implicit learning happens automatically through the subconscious with conditioning and practice. Explicit learning requires consciousness and conscious activity, such as memorization and articulation. Both of these systems are used in creating memories of people, places, skills, and experiences.

being under
Anesthesia

The unconscious mind can recall experiences under anesthesia. 

A study from the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) in March 2014 proved that rats can remember the odor that they were introduced to while under deep anesthesia. This supports a study published in 1998 in the Journal of Neuroscience which found that the cerebellum (the part of the brain that coordinates and regulates muscular activity) plays an active role in olfaction (the sense of smell and capacity to smell).

Head olfactory nerve
The Olfactory Nerve

Explicit and Implicit memory systems work together to form our memory as we know it: the ability to tie our shoes, walk on two feet, throw a basketball, recall childhood memories, recalling how people make you feel, etc.

Abstract design made of head outlines, lights and abstract design elements on the subject of intelligence,  consciousness, logical thinking, mental processes and brain power
Abstract design made of head outlines, lights and abstract design elements on the subject of intelligence, consciousness, logical thinking, mental processes and brain power

For much more detail and more information on human memory and the subconscious’s roles, use these links:

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-athletes-way/201403/new-clues-the-inner-workings-the-unconscious-mind

http://www.medicaldaily.com/pulse/how-human-memory-works-why-brain-remembers-and-forgets-plus-3-ways-improve-memory-354326

How We Remember, and Why We Forget

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